Ensure that every American who works hard and plays by the rules has the opportunity to live the American dream #PushTheVote

As November 6th becomes the focal point of this election season. As speculation continues over whether the House and or Senate will change leadership, my attention turns toward Georgia. Not because of the obvious reasons, but because of what this “opportunity” the represents for Voters of Color (VOC), the Youth Vote (YV), and institutions of faith. Although census data shows that Atlanta only grew 0.8% to 420,003, neighboring Athens-Clark County grew by 15% to 116,714. This significant growth may help to give Georgia a new congressional seat plus an extra Electoral College vote in 2020.

What kind of leader will we choose? Will it be someone with a strong sense of duty and tumblr_np2yyf6ybI1qfirfao1_1280responsibility to every person in this country? Will they remain focused and committed to serving the needs of Americans even during “hard times?” After the long list of surprise victories this year, I feel like we may be turning a corner.

So far it seems that this election is about priorities. Voters want to know if “your priorities reflect the reality of our educational system, civil rights, and economic resurgence?” They seem to want to know more about women’s healthcare, higher education, and middle class safety nets and “must do” fiscal treatments. Voters believe what most experts have acknowledged for years — “at the end of the day investing in the economy is good for the economy.”

Moreover, Voters of Color (VOC) in places like Georgia are becoming energized. In fact, the political landscape resembles that of November 3, 1998 where the hyper-partisan nature motivated communities of color to demonstrate their concerns through the power of the vote. In 1998 Voters of Color were 30% of the vote share. Progressive candidates won the governorship, retained control of both houses of the legislature, and candidates of color made significant gains.

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As history has shown, Voters of Color can make a difference in the outcome of elections. For example, VOC in Georgia make up close to 35% of the citizen voting age population and most of those registered voted in 2008. In fact, POC made up 34% of the vote share in the 2008 general election. This number increased to 35% in 2010, a Tea Party wave year. The potential impact would be significant in 2018 if every eligible Voter of Color voted. Especially in cities like Atlanta and Athens-Clark County where there are over 230,000 “Key” Voters of Color combined.

This takes me back to something I learned years ago. It’s important for everyone— Whites, Latinos, African Americans, Asians, and Native Americans—to work within an all-inclusive cooperative environment. 2018 is a critical moment for our nation as we remain committed to ensuring that our democracy leaves no one behind. Organizations and institutions within our communities must embrace a diverse and energetic approach to political enfranchisement.

 

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Everyone should have the opportunity to live the American Dream

America is in the middle of a demographic explosion, and we are now seeing the signs of a new “electoral” paradigm. With the results of last night’s election, Ayanna Pressley (congressional candidate for Massachusetts 7th District) advancing to the general election. Although this outcome was a shock to many, there is reason to believe that there will be more women candidates of color “winning” in the near future.

It’s notable she received 55,743 votes last night but a closer look at past election results reveals a winning path for future candidates of color and women. In 2013 Ayanna Pressley, an African American woman and the first woman of color ever elected to the Boston City Council, demonstrated how unifying the voters of color is key to maximizing the impact of voters of color (VOC).

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Let me explain by comparing the results of Boston’s preliminary 2013 mayoral race with Pressley’s at-large 2013 city council race. Pressley ran among a pool of 20 candidates for one of four run-off spots. She won with 17% (42,915) of the votes cast for the City Council candidates. That same year, candidates Martin Walsh and John Connolly received 18% (20,854) of the vote and 17% (19,435) of the vote respectfully. Combined that’s only 40,289 total votes, 2,626 fewer votes than Pressley received in her race.

How was Pressley able to win more votes in comparison to two mayoral candidates — especially given the fact that Pressley competed in a larger pool of candidates? She wontumblr_np2zk316Xe1qfirfao1_1280 because she was able to consolidate her base of votes from women, people of color and progressives. In short, she had the opportunity to run as the only prominent woman of color. Let’s look at this from a demographic perspective using Ward 18, which encompasses Hyde Park — this neighborhood embodies one of the greatest VOC potentials candidates of color and women.

Here some important trends:

  1. This area is considered a super voter “sweet spot” – an area with a large pool of voters that consistently vote.
  2. Hyde Park’s African American and Latino populations grew 22% and 67% respectfully making people of color 78% of the population.
  3. Pressley won Ward 18 with 5,490 votes in 2013 and did really well this year too.
  4. In 2013, the top 3 mayoral candidates of color Charlotte Golar Richie, Felix Arroyo, and John Barros, split the Ward 18 vote 2314, 1160, and 1039 respectively.

The splintering of the vote was also seen in neighborhoods like Hyde Park where the lack of consensus among progressive groups and voters created conflicting loyalties. Arroyo grew up in Hyde Park but found it difficult to close the vote gap without networking and unifying efforts with other candidates like John Barros.

Needless to say, the demographic advantage doesn’t guarantee that multiple candidates of color can run in the same election and win. However, Pressley’s success points to an opportunity for investment in neighborhoods that may yield a significant return. This also means the opportunities in neighborhoods like Hyde Park have become prime openings for good candidates with commonsense messages to breakthrough. We believe that if this electorate is engaged with resources, the right message, a good candidate, and a successful voter registration campaign – we may take a huge step forward towards electing a historic number of women of color.

Thank you for your support in all that you do. Remember to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Instagram for latest updates and we’ll be in touch again soon with more from Push The Vote.