Our system works when everyone gets a fair shot

Can you believe that the race for Governor in Florida now features a “Progressive” Person of Color! After this week’s gaff by his opponent, this should be a fascinating race considering Hispanics make up more than 12% of the Republican Party in Florida.

 

As I stated before, the fundamentals of this election mirror 2010 (with a different result). There is clear evidence that increased civic participation by communities of color can offset any conceivable lag in progressive voter turnout.

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Soon this election season will kick into full swing, and it is clear that there are a number of important states and districts in which People of Color (POC) may help to decide both primary and general election results. For example POC in Florida make up 29.5% of the Citizen Voting Age Population and 69% are registered to vote. The key is turnout. Remember even in a great “turnout year” like 2008, POC made up 28.9% of the vote share in the general election although more than a third did not vote (37.7%). Imagine what could happen in 2018 if we energize and turn out every eligible voter? Especially in places like Jacksonville, FL where there are over 200,000 “Key” POC voters.

 

Changes in congressional seats are at stake as well. We know that reapportionment gave Florida two congressional seats in 2010. Many voters have moved in and out of those districts for 8 years now. In fact, Florida may pick up one more seat therefore the race Governor will impact 2020 redistricting.

 

There is no doubt that there will be a number of heated congressional contests as well. In these races, pitting refurbished candidates against surging progressive candidates, the momentum is swinging progressive. Most of the focus this year will be on the fact that the Democrats need a bunch of seats to take back the house and the Republicans need a few seats to keep control of the Senate.

 

But there are other dynamics in these elections that may prove to be far more significant. Political experts often portray people of color as incidental as it relates to the broader sphere of American politics. Moreover, they seem to find it difficult to connect exceptional election results to evidence-based demographic trends. On one hand, we all recognize the fact that certain POC turnout levels will produce certain results. On the other hand, some of us miss the fact that those turnout levels in 2008 were connected to resources and political investment in POC communities.

 

The same holds true for other parts of the country. Young POC politicians are running for office in Georgia, Maryland, Texas, Ohio, Arizona, Nevada, and a number of places in California but without adequate resources they will need to win..

 

There is no doubt that these candidates are more than capable of running competent campaigns. The truth is, they are beneficiaries of the civil rights movement and gained valuable tools from our forebears. That’s probably what led them to throw their hat in the ring to begin with. Their interests represent our collective guiding beliefs. Once in office, POC politicians will have the opportunity to build coalitions and work towards creating a collective social, cultural, and economic apparatus for people of color, communities of faith and young people.

 

But will their war chest benefit from the collective social economic advancements of the progressive community? Will they receive the support they need to defeat their opponents? If we care about diversity in political leadership, we shouldn’t just express our support through the vote. We should express our concern through monetary civic engagement. The fact is, if you invest political resources in a POC candidate this year, you will most likely have a positive return.

 

Thank you for your support in all that you do. Remember to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Instagram for latest updates and we’ll be in touch again soon with more from Push The Vote.

 

Sincerely,

 

Raven, Daya, Chuck, Kirk and the #PushTheVote Team

 

The promise of America is that every child will have the opportunity #PushTheVote

How does the Arizona primary results impact the people who most need economic and social justice? Young people are our future and the promise of America is that every child will have the opportunity to grow up to live a successful life. This is only possible when every child receives a quality education. It will take sound programs, schools, and policies that work and we have to vote to make this a reality.

I predict the fundamentals of this election will mirror 2010 but will have a different result. With adequate resources and a cooperative spirit, people of color, communities of faith and young people have the potential to have impact in states like Arizona and Georgia.

There is clear evidence that increased civic participation by communities of color can offset any conceivable lag in progressive voter turnout.  For example, according to a study by the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, the African American share of the total vote in Illinois increased from 10 percent in 2006 to 19 percent in 2010.  Due to this strong turnout, a candidate who embraced progressive views became governor with only one-third of the white vote.

The same was true for Latinos in Colorado, and Nevada. In Nevada where Latinos represent 16% of the vote share, 69% voted for the progressive Senate candidate. This was an increase of 4% over the 2006 turnout. In Colorado, Latinos were an impressive 12% of the vote share and pushed the progressive candidate over the top.

I believe that with proper resources and civic momentum, people of color, communities of faith and young people can impact voter turnout rates this year. If we close the gaps between the populations that are eligible and likely voters, we will have a better chance of regaining our voice and enacting education policies that work. For example a progressive candidate could win Georgia with just 41% of the White vote and Arizona with just 37%.

The truth is that Americans have and can continue to come together to develop transformational relationships that dramatically impact civic engagement, education, culture, and economics. Young African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and Native Americans have always participated in elections. However, their expanding share of the electorate has the potential to reinforce America’s steadfastness for a new all-inclusive brand of education.

Thank you for your support in all that you do. Remember to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter or Instagram for latest updates and we’ll be in touch again soon with more from Push The Vote.

Sincerely,

Raven, Daya, Chuck, Kirk and the #PushTheVote Team